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Teen Girls' Health

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Shaving Tips for Teen Girls

Girls, are you starting to see hair in places where you've never seen it before? Now that you're reaching puberty, you have an increase in hormones (androgens) that causes darker hair on your legs, under your arms, and around your pubic area to appear. In American culture, many girls start shaving hair on their legs and underarms at this time. Here are some shaving tips just for girls.

When to Start Shaving

There's no set time for girls to begin shaving. You can start shaving when you feel you have enough hair growth on your legs and/or armpits to shave it off. Talk to some women in your family -- perhaps your mother, an older sister who has already started shaving, your favorite aunt, or someone else you trust. Ask them if you are ready to start shaving. If you are, they can teach you how to begin -- safely.

Which Razor to Use for Shaving

To start shaving, you have to find a razor that is safe, effective, and easy to use. Get your dad, mom, or older sibling to take you to a discount store or pharmacy.

You will find two popular types of razors: electric and manual. An electric razor may come with a cord, or in a rechargeable and cordless design. A disposable razor or safety razor can have several blades stacked one on top of the other. It can provide you with a very close shave.

Here are some details about each type of razor:

  • Electric razors. Electric razors are convenient. But many models don't shave as closely as disposable razors. If you want to go with an electric razor, select one that will contour to your skin. Some razors are specifically designed for teenage girls. Some electric razors also dispense moisturizers. Be aware that even though you are using an electric razor, it can still irritate the skin. Take the time to find one that's right for you.
  • Disposable or safety razors. If you go with a disposable or safety razor, you may also want to buy shaving cream or gel. These help lubricate skin and reduce the risk of nicks and cuts. There are many to choose from. Some even include moisturizers to help keep your skin from drying out. Avoid creams or gels that have alcohol that could irritate skin. Lather acts like a buffer on the skin, so the richer the lather, the less chance you have of cutting yourself. Regular bar soap or liquid shower soap will work too.

 

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