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What is the female athlete triad?

ANSWER

The female athlete triad is made up of three medical conditions that are becoming increasingly common in active teen girls:

  • Energy imbalance with or without an eating disorder
  • Menstrual disturbances
  • Decreased bone mineral density with or without osteoporosis Low-calorie diets are usually the first sign of eating disorders. Excessive exercise or exercise obsession can be another sign.

From: The Female Athlete Triad WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

Johnston, C. 1992.  New England Journal of Medicine,

Laughlin, G. 1996.  Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism,

Warren, M., 2001.  Journal of Endocrinology,

National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Panel on Optimal Calcium Intake, 1994.  Journal of the American Medical Association,

Wyshak, G, 2000.  Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine,

Female Athlete Triad Coalition web site. 

Children's Hospital Boston's Center for Young Women's Heath web site.

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on February 26, 2018

SOURCES: 

Johnston, C. 1992.  New England Journal of Medicine,

Laughlin, G. 1996.  Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism,

Warren, M., 2001.  Journal of Endocrinology,

National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Panel on Optimal Calcium Intake, 1994.  Journal of the American Medical Association,

Wyshak, G, 2000.  Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine,

Female Athlete Triad Coalition web site. 

Children's Hospital Boston's Center for Young Women's Heath web site.

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on February 26, 2018

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Who is at risk for female athlete triad?

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