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Who is at risk for female athlete triad?

ANSWER

Teen girls who restrict their eating and have amenorrhea are at highest risk for female athlete triad. Female athletes who try to reach a low body weight for running or dancing are more likely to have amenorrhea, as are those who compete in scoring sports such as gymnastics and figure skating.

From: The Female Athlete Triad WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

Johnston, C. 1992.  New England Journal of Medicine,

Laughlin, G. 1996.  Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism,

Warren, M., 2001.  Journal of Endocrinology,

National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Panel on Optimal Calcium Intake, 1994.  Journal of the American Medical Association,

Wyshak, G, 2000.  Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine,

Female Athlete Triad Coalition web site. 

Children's Hospital Boston's Center for Young Women's Heath web site.

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on February 26, 2018

SOURCES: 

Johnston, C. 1992.  New England Journal of Medicine,

Laughlin, G. 1996.  Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism,

Warren, M., 2001.  Journal of Endocrinology,

National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Panel on Optimal Calcium Intake, 1994.  Journal of the American Medical Association,

Wyshak, G, 2000.  Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine,

Female Athlete Triad Coalition web site. 

Children's Hospital Boston's Center for Young Women's Heath web site.

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on February 26, 2018

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What causes a female athlete to not get her period, apart from pregnancy?

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