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How can I help treat my mononucleosis at home?

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  • Get plenty of rest. Sleep helps your body fight the infection.
  • Avoid contact sports as well as other activities until your doctor says it's OK. This helps protect your spleen. A hit or fall could make it break open, or rupture. A ruptured spleen causes internal bleeding, which is a life-threatening condition.
  • Drink a lot of fluids. If your body does not have enough water, you can become dehydrated. Dehydration can make you feel worse.
  • Rinse your mouth or gargle with salt water. This can help soothe a sore throat. You can also try sucking on hard candy or eating a Popsicle.
  • Take acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) for aches and pains. Do NOT take aspirin because of the risk of Reye syndrome, a rare but serious condition that typically affects people ages 4 to 14 who are recovering from chickenpox or another viral illness.

From: Mononucleosis in Teens FAQ WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

FamilyDoctor.org: "Mononucleosis."

American Academy of Pediatrics Healthy Children: "Mononucleosis."

CDC: "Epstein-Barr Virus and Infectious Mononucleosis."

The Merck Manual Home Health Handbook for Patients and Caregivers: "Epstein-Barr Virus Infection."

KidsHealth.org: "Reye syndrome" and "Expert Answers On..."

 

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on December 05, 2017

SOURCES:

FamilyDoctor.org: "Mononucleosis."

American Academy of Pediatrics Healthy Children: "Mononucleosis."

CDC: "Epstein-Barr Virus and Infectious Mononucleosis."

The Merck Manual Home Health Handbook for Patients and Caregivers: "Epstein-Barr Virus Infection."

KidsHealth.org: "Reye syndrome" and "Expert Answers On..."

 

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on December 05, 2017

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How long will it take me to feel better from mononucleosis?

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