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How common is teen suicide?

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Suicide is the third leading cause of death among people between ages 15 and 24, with about 5,000 lives lost each year. But attempted suicides greatly outnumber suicides.

Because males often choose more violent methods, they're often more successful. But females may attempt suicide more often.

From: Preventing Teen Suicide WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Mash, Eric J., Wolfe, David A., Second Ed., Wadsworth Learning, Belmont, Calif., 2001. Fieve, Ronald R, Rodale, New York, 2006. American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry: "Facts for Families: Teen Suicide." National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: ''Suicide at a Glance.'' Suicide Prevention Resource Center: "Risk and Protective Factors for Suicide." National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. American Foundation for Suicide Prevention: "Facts and Figures." Abnormal Child Psychopathology.Bipolar II,

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on February 12, 2019

SOURCES: Mash, Eric J., Wolfe, David A., Second Ed., Wadsworth Learning, Belmont, Calif., 2001. Fieve, Ronald R, Rodale, New York, 2006. American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry: "Facts for Families: Teen Suicide." National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: ''Suicide at a Glance.'' Suicide Prevention Resource Center: "Risk and Protective Factors for Suicide." National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. American Foundation for Suicide Prevention: "Facts and Figures." Abnormal Child Psychopathology.Bipolar II,

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on February 12, 2019

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What are risk factors for teen suicide?

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