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How do you treat skin to keep it healthy?

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Many teens need to treat skin conditions such as acne, which occurs when pores on the surface of skin become clogged. This happens when oil glands produce too much oil, and pores get blocked with dirt, bacteria, and debris. Sometimes, moisturizers and greasy cosmetics contribute to the development of acne. Oils or dyes in hair products can worsen acne by blocking pores.

While soaps and astringents remove oil from the skin, they don't alter the oil production. Scrubbing the skin sometimes causes irritation, which triggers acne instead of resolving it.

Skin products containing benzoyl peroxide may help to treat mild acne if you use them sparingly (once daily). The goal is to treat all oily areas of the face -- forehead, chin, nose, and cheeks -- not just where you notice pimples. Treating the areas that tend to break out may help prevent future pimples.

Some of these products can cause the skin to become too dry if overused. If you feel stinging or burning, rinse your skin with mild soap and water. Try the topical benzoyl peroxide again the next day.

Some over-the-counter acne products can cause rare but serious allergic reactions or severe irritation. Seek emergency medical attention if you have symptoms such as throat tightness, difficulty breathing, feeling faint, or swelling of the face or tongue. Also stop using the product if you develop hives or itching. Symptoms can appear anywhere from minutes to a day or longer after use.

Be aware that you must use benzoyl peroxide daily for a least a month before you'll see the full effect. You have to be a bit patient.

From: Skin Care Tips for Teens WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

Beyond Botox, Ben and Howard Kominsky, 2006. 

Patientsuptodate.com web site: "Patient Information: Acne." 

American Academy of Dermatology website: "How Dry I Am" and "Face Facts." 

SkinCarePhysicians.com web site: "AcneNet: 7 Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Acne Treatment."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on August 27, 2019

SOURCES: 

Beyond Botox, Ben and Howard Kominsky, 2006. 

Patientsuptodate.com web site: "Patient Information: Acne." 

American Academy of Dermatology website: "How Dry I Am" and "Face Facts." 

SkinCarePhysicians.com web site: "AcneNet: 7 Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Acne Treatment."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on August 27, 2019

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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