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What are common plastic surgery procedures for teens?

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The most common plastic surgeries for teenagers include:

  • Rhinoplasty (nose reshaping or a nose job). The nose must have reached its adult, which usually happens to girls by age 15 or 16, and in boys by age 16 or 17.
  • Otoplasty (ear pinback) may be done after the age of about 5 or 6 years.
  • Chin augmentation or reshaping the chin may be done during the teenage years.
  • Breast asymmetry correction may be done when one breast is different from the other in size or shape.
  • Breast reduction can benefit teen girls as young as age 15 who are embarrassed by very large breasts, or who are having shoulder pain, back pain, or breathing trouble.
  • Gynecomastia to treat excessive breast growth in male teens that doesn’t go away on its own.
  • Laser treatment or dermabrasion may be used to smooth skin scarring caused by acne. Collagen or other filler injections are also sometimes used to repair skin defects.

From: Teens and Plastic Surgery WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: American Society of Plastic Surgeons web site: "Plastic Surgery for Teenagers." Enhancement Media.com web site: "Plastic Surgery for Teens." MedicineNet web site: "Is Plastic Surgery a Teen Thing?"

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on February 12, 2019

SOURCES: American Society of Plastic Surgeons web site: "Plastic Surgery for Teenagers." Enhancement Media.com web site: "Plastic Surgery for Teens." MedicineNet web site: "Is Plastic Surgery a Teen Thing?"

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on February 12, 2019

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