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Why is exercise important for your mood?

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Research shows that regular exercise reduces symptoms of moderate depression and enhances psychological fitness. Exercise can even produce changes in certain chemical levels in the body, which can have an effect on the psychological state.

Endorphins are hormones in the brain associated with a happy, positive feeling. A low level of endorphins is associated with depression. During exercise, plasma levels of this substance increase. This may help to ease symptoms of depression

Exercise also boosts the neurotransmitter serotonin in the brain. Neurotransmitters are chemicals that send specific messages from one brain cell to another. Though only a small percentage of all serotonin is located in the brain, this neurotransmitter is thought to play a key role in keeping your mood calm.

From: How Regular Exercise Benefits Teens WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Donnelly, J. , 2004. 
Best Practice and Research: Clinical Gastroenterology

Hoffman and Goetz L. 1998.  Nutrition Reviews,

Gura, S. 2002.  Work,

Health2Fit: "Health and Fitness Resources and Information." 

American College of Sports Medicine. 

CNN.com Health/Library. 

Mayo Clinic.

Kidshealth.org.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on April 18, 2019

SOURCES: Donnelly, J. , 2004. 
Best Practice and Research: Clinical Gastroenterology

Hoffman and Goetz L. 1998.  Nutrition Reviews,

Gura, S. 2002.  Work,

Health2Fit: "Health and Fitness Resources and Information." 

American College of Sports Medicine. 

CNN.com Health/Library. 

Mayo Clinic.

Kidshealth.org.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on April 18, 2019

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