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  • Question 1/8

    Some people can control their dreams.

  • Answer 1/8

    Some people can control their dreams.

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    Dreams don't just happen -- you may be able to have some say. How? Every night when you go to bed, focus on what you want to dream about. Soon, you may find you can shape your dreams.

     

    Some people can control dreams while they're happening. It's called "lucid dreaming" -- they know they're dreaming and can change the story as they go.

  • Question 1/8

    Some people don't dream.

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    Some people don't dream.

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    Everybody has dreams. But some of us have trouble remembering them. One reason? You may not be getting enough sleep. Some scientists believe sleep helps your mind process what you do during the day and turn it into memories.

     

    You need at least 8.5 to 9.25 hours of sleep a night. Remember that the next time you’re thinking about pulling an all-nighter to cram for a test. Your brain needs sleep to soak in knowledge.

  • Question 1/8

    If you die in a dream, you die in real life.

  • Answer 1/8

    If you die in a dream, you die in real life.

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    Maybe you've heard this urban legend, but it’s not true. People "die" in dreams and wake up fine all the time.

     

    Nightmares happen to everyone. But if you have them a lot, think about why. Stress can trigger them. Feeling frazzled? Sometimes writing out your stresses in a journal can help you feel better and sleep better.

  • Question 1/8

    If you doze in class and then jolt awake from a vivid dream, you:

  • Answer 1/8

    If you doze in class and then jolt awake from a vivid dream, you:

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    Dreams are not supposed to start until you've been asleep for more than an hour. When you don't get enough sleep at night, your body can jump straight into the dream stage of sleep. But you won't be well-rested.

     

    For better sleep, try turning off all electronics, including your phone, an hour before bed to unwind. The light electronics give off can trick your brain into thinking it’s time to be awake.

  • Question 1/8

    Not getting enough sleep can cause:

  • Answer 1/8

    Not getting enough sleep can cause:

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    Yeah, not getting enough sleep can make you feel bad, but it can also make you feel hungry. People who are tired are more likely to crave junk food and overeat. Your body is craving energy from food because it's exhausted.

     

    Be good to your body -- if you need a snack, reach for a healthy one. And if you have a hard time winding down before bed, set yourself an alarm as a reminder to get ready for bed.

  • Answer 1/8

    The word "nightmare" originally meant:

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    The word mareis Old English -- it means a witch or spirit or goblin. A "nightmare" supposedly would crawl on top of you while you slept, paralyzing you and causing you to have scary dreams.

     

    But what do dreams mean? While there are plenty of dream dictionaries out there, they are just guesses. Only you can decide the meaning of your dreams.

  • Question 1/8

    Most people become paralyzed when they sleep.

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    Most people become paralyzed when they sleep.

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    It's sounds creepy: For about 2 hours every night while you sleep, your body is paralyzed. But it's to protect you from acting out your dreams and accidentally hurting yourself. Of course, you don't know that you can't move. You're busy dreaming.

     

    Weird fact: People who say they've been abducted by aliens may really have had delusions when they partially woke up while they were sleeping.

  • Question 1/8

    Which of these animals probably dreams?

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    Which of these animals probably dreams?

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    Our most vivid dreams happen during the REM stages of sleep. Rats -- like most mammals and some birds -- have REM sleep just like us. Does that mean animals dream? Scientists think so.

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    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Awesome work! You're wide awake and know all about dreams. Just remember to get enough good sleep tonight for a great day tomorrow. Sweet dreams!

    Results:

    Not bad. But remember getting good sleep can help your body and your mind. Get some good rest and try this quiz again tomorrow.

    Results:

    Zzzzzz. Looks like you learned a lot about dreams and sleep. Get your 8.5 hours of sleep a night to look and feel your best!

Sources | Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on May 08, 2016 Medically Reviewed on May 08, 2016

Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on
May 08, 2016

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

Question 1-8) Roberto A Sanchez / Vetta
Results Image) Roland Dan / Flickr

SOURCES:

American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry: "Helping Teenagers with Stress."

American Academy of Sleep Medicine: "Daytime Sleepiness is Associated with an Increased Craving for Carbs Among Teens."

American Psychological Association: "What Are the Signs of Excessive Sleepiness?"

Cohen, S. Archives of Internal Medicine, January 2009.

Harvard University Gazette: "Alien Abduction Claims Explained."

Association for the Study of Dreams: "Common Questions about Dreams."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "What Is Narcolepsy?"

National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep."

National Sleep Foundation: "How Much Sleep Do We Really Need?" "Caffeine and Sleep," "Teens and Sleep," "Obesity and Sleep," "In Your Dreams," "Sleep and Parasomnias," "School Start Time and Sleep," "Dreams and Sleep," "Animal Sleep."

Norman, K. Current Biology, Aug. 8, 2006.

Psychology Today: "Twas the Night Before School," "8 Secrets for Outwitting a Bad Mood."

HelpGuide: "Stress Management," "How Much Sleep Do You Need?"

International Association for the Study of Dreams: "Common Questions about Dreams."

Quantitative Study of Dreams: "Frequently Asked Questions."

HealthChildren: "Sleep and Mental Health."

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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